RNA Directed

Biophysically constrained beginnings of RNA and DNA

Any anonymous participant in the discussion of: DNA may have had humble beginnings as nutrient carrier (Sep 01, 2014 by Adam Hadhazy) asks: “when are you going to keep quiet?” In a series of responses, I have explained the problem I have with honoring his request. The following excerpts from Wikipedia and other sources are loosely strung together because there is no point to providing more extensive details of biologically-based cause and effect until others accept the fact that mutations…

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microRNAs differentiate neuronal cell types

microRNAs: key triggers of neuronal cell fate Excerpt: “In light of the fact that miRNAs have very precise expression patterns depending on the cell type, tissue and/or developmental stage; it is challenging to generalize a single mechanism to regulate their expression and to identify the target genes that each miRNA has during each stage of neurogenesis. Thus, the combination of bioinformatic tools and experimental techniques will help in the study of miRNAs role in early neurogenesis and how they, their…

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Cell-type differentiation

How Do You Know When You’ve Found Them All? A Question That Applies To Beetles and Cancer Genes Alike by Carl Zimmer Conclusion: “Cancer biologists and beetle experts are not all that different when you think about it. They walk the same foggy road together, a long way from the end.” My comment: Only the cancer biologists and beetle experts who believe in mutation-driven evolution are walking a road together. It’s not a foggy road. It’s brain fog that makes them similar.…

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96 fixed amino acid substitutions, not 96 genes

19 December, 2013 – 09:31 april holloway Entire Neanderthal genome finally mapped – with amazing results Excerpt (with my emphasis): “Only 96 genes responsible for making proteins in cells are different between modern humans and Neanderthals. Intriguingly, some of the gene differences involve ones involved in both immune responses and the development of brain cells in people.” “Somewhere within these 96 genes may lay the answer to why Neanderthals and Denisovans became extinct.” Journal article: The complete genome sequence of a Neanderthal from the Altai Mountains Excerpt (with…

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Social experiences epigenetically effect gene networks

Networks of Genes Respond to Social Experiences October 13, 2013, from Searching for the Mind with Jon Lieff, M.D. Excerpt 1: “The gene networks of social experience are consistent through many animals.” My comment: Not just many animals; the gene networks of social experiences must be consistent in all animals that adaptively evolved. You cannot get from microbes to man with any consistent model of cause and effect until you realize that the molecular mechanisms that enable cause and effect…

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Understanding the role of mutations and evolution

On  Fri Aug 16, 2013 at 10:21 am,  Clarence ‘Sonny’ Williams wrote: “As for mutations, some members of this group might have a misunderstanding regarding the role of mutations and evolution.  A review of college textbooks on evolution reveal this: Mutations are any change to the genomic sequence of an organism and mutations ARE REQUIRED for evolution. Yes, there are a few scientists who argue for such things as “genetic engineering” (e.g., James Shapiro) and “germ line epigenetic inheritance” in mammals (e.g., Eva…

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Alzheimer's, microRNAs, and olfaction

A Blood Test for Alzheimer’s? Circulating microRNAs could help doctors diagnose the neurodegenerative disease. By Jef Akst | July 30, 2013 Excerpt: “Testing the blood of 202 people for 140 different microRNAs (miRNAs), a team of researchers at Saarland University, in Germany, identified 12 RNA fragments circulating at consistently different levels in healthy people and patients with Alzheimer’s…” My comment: In my model, the microRNA/messenger RNA balance is nutrient-dependent and pheromone-controlled. The epigenetic landscape becomes the physical landscape of DNA…

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Pheromones and cancer

Transcription Factor-MicroRNA-Target Gene Networks Associated with Ovarian Cancer Survival and Recurrence Excerpt: “MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNA molecules that bind to complementary sequences on target mRNA transcripts, and thus, regulate gene expression at the post-transcription stage. Transcription factors (TFs) are a different type of regulator. These proteins bind to specific DNA sequences in the promoter region, promoting or repressing transcription into mRNA, and thus, regulate genes at a pre-transcription stage [4]. TFs and miRNAs can regulate each other and…

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  • What Darwin proved: there’s no such thing as a species
    GENETICS As Animals Mingle, a Baffling Genetic Barrier A short stretch of DNA is challenging what it means to be a species. By: Emily Singer August 5, 2014 Excerpt: “Scientists have dubbed such regions of the genome “islands of speciation.” The persistence of such islands is a phenomenon that has been observed in a variety of […]
  • Randomness and Divine Providence
    A Q&A on randomness and God’s providence …the main goal is to really put together a collection of scholarly studies of these issues: physicists, biologists, mathematicians, statisticians, philosophers and theologians. replaced: Randomness and Divine Providence Supported by the John Templeton...Read more