Scent of Eros

Selfish X-linked alleles and X chromosome inactivation

From Fertilization to Adult Sexual Behavior In our section on molecular epigenetics from 1996 we wrote: Genomic-imprinting is also manifest in specific parts of the X-inactivation region’s related XIST gene. Here male- and female-specific methyl-group patterns participate in X-inactivation in females and also in the preferential inactivation of the paternal X in human placentae of female concepti (Harrison, 1989; Monk, 1995). This process indicates that tissues of the early conceptus can sense and react differentially to epigenetic sexual dimorphisms on…

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Your indifference is killing you and others (4)

Summary: I suspect that Subatomic, like Cytosis, will help link atoms to ecosystems via my model of nutritional epigenetics and the pheromone-controlled visual perception of mass and energy, which has been linked from the sense of smell in bacteria across the space time continuum via olfaction. From 7 years ago. Published 7 years ago on 15 Aug 2010 by James V. Kohl of Pheromones.com, RNA-mediated.com, and Autophagy.pro Kohl is the co-author of “The Scent of Eros” and he is the…

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Energy-dependent physical and biophysical constraints (9)

Summary: Energy determines genome compaction because activity in the nucleus is energy-dependent. Chromatin chains link energy-dependent changes in base pairs from single nucleotide polymorphisms to fixation of RNA-mediated amino acid substitutions in organized genomes via the physiology of pheromone-controlled reproduction. It’s all about the base. Energy-dependent physical and biophysical constraints (8) ChromEMT: Visualizing 3D chromatin structure and compaction in interphase and mitotic cells Excerpt 1) The chromatin structure of DNA determines genome compaction and activity in the nucleus. My comment:…

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Ecological genomics: teleophobes respond (too late)

Forecasting Ecological Genomics: High-Tech Animal Instrumentation Meets High-Throughput Sequencing Conclusion: Twenty years ago, an essay about sequencing genomes and remotely tracking animals across the globe in real time would have been the subject of science fiction. In 2015, there are over 50,000 animals being tracked [12], and single research groups now sequence dozens, up to hundreds, of individual genomes [17,82]. By embracing new technology and integrating these data streams into an ecological genomic framework (Fig 1), we are now poised…

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Mystery machine vs medical intelligence

There’s a Mystery Machine That Sculpts the Human Genome Excerpt 1) This is an important milestone in understanding the three dimensional structure of chromosomes, but like most great papers, it raises more questions than it provides answers… My comment: That claim is common among researchers who need to keep being funded. Excerpt 2) “There’s a growing appreciation that some diseases are related to how the genome is oriented rather than just a mutation,” adds Rao. “This is a little speculative,…

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Re-inventing a completely new thing

Ancient Viruses, Once Foes, May Now Serve as Friends Excerpt 1) “A new study published in the journal Nature on Monday suggests that endogenous retroviruses spring to life in the earliest stages of the development of human embryos. The viruses may even assist in human development by helping guide embryonic development and by defending young cells from infections by other viruses.” Excerpt 2) “Dr. Wysocka acknowledged that the evidence she and her colleagues had gathered was only suggestive at this…

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Forces of "Nature" limit dissemination of information

Force of nature gave life its asymmetry Excerpt: “In 2011, Meierhenrich and colleages showed4 that such light could transfer its handedness to amino acids. But even demonstrating how a common physical phenomenon would have favoured left-handed amino acids over right-handed ones would not tell us that this was how life evolved, adds Laurence Barron, a chemist at the University of Glasgow, UK. “There are no clinchers. We may never know.” My comment:I think the clincher is the creation of the…

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Did our adapted mind evolve?

What is currently know about neuroendocrine regulation clearly links ecological variation to ecological adaptations manifested in morphological and behavioral phenotypes via RNA-mediated events without the pseudoscientific nonsense of evolutionary theory. Evidence that biological facts about cause and effect make no difference to theorists shows up in what we can expect from conference presentations next year. ADAPTED MIND, ADAPTED BODY: THE EVOLUTION OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND ITS NEUROENDOCRINE REGULATION The idea that the human behavior evolved in the context of neuroendocrine…

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  • What Darwin proved: there’s no such thing as a species
    GENETICS As Animals Mingle, a Baffling Genetic Barrier A short stretch of DNA is challenging what it means to be a species. By: Emily Singer August 5, 2014 Excerpt: “Scientists have dubbed such regions of the genome “islands of speciation.” The persistence of such islands is a phenomenon that has been observed in a variety of […]
  • Randomness and Divine Providence
    A Q&A on randomness and God’s providence …the main goal is to really put together a collection of scholarly studies of these issues: physicists, biologists, mathematicians, statisticians, philosophers and theologians. replaced: Randomness and Divine Providence Supported by the John Templeton...Read more