Cell Type

Physics, Chemistry, and Molecular biology (PCMb)

Physics, Chemistry, and Molecular biology (PCMb) link ecological variation to ecological adaptations via a model of gene-cell-tissue-organ-organ system complexity that I first presented in 1992. After adding gene activation by pheromones, I co-authored a book that linked the pheromone-controlled physiology of reproduction across species from microbes to man: The Scent of Eros: Mysteries of Odor in Human Sexuality (1995/2002) Since then, others have written books that claimed that pheromones evolved: Pheromones and Animal Behaviour (2003/2014) and one claimed that mammals…

Read More

Nutrient-dependent pheromone-controlled exercise-induced physiques

How to explain exercise-induced phenotype from molecular data: rethink and reconstruction based on AMPK and mTOR signaling Excerpt: “…cellular and molecular phenotype for exercise capacity is always acquired from regular exercise or muscle contraction; it is absurd to use drug and gene modification…” My comment: What is known about RNA-mediated events shows that the slightest deficit in nutrient uptake will be manifested in your exercise-induced physique, which is also epigenetically-effected by the pheromones of others via the same pathway. Meanwhile,…

Read More

A molecular visualizer of worthwhile molecular biology

Ruben Gonzalez Jr.: Molecular Visualizer Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Chemistry, Columbia University. Age 42 By Jef Akst | September 1, 2014 Excerpt: “Much of his group’s current work involves extending discoveries about translation in E. coli to the process in eukaryotes, with an eye toward human health and disease.” My comment: That sums up the frustration that other serious scientists must share when they hear pseudoscientific nonsense touted about mutations, natural selection, and the evolution…

Read More

RNA-mediated ecological adaptation is not evolution

Prehistoric Critters Change View of Mammal Evolution Three extinct squirrel-like species were identified from Jurassic-era fossils in China. By Molly Sharlach | September 12, 2014 Excerpt 1): “The fossils suggest that the slender animals spent time in trees, and had hands and feet adapted for grabbing branches. Their resemblance to present-day squirrels is a result of convergent evolution, as they belong to a lineage that diverged from that of modern mammals long ago.” My comment: Resemblance in the fossil record…

Read More

microRNAs differentiate neuronal cell types

microRNAs: key triggers of neuronal cell fate Excerpt: “In light of the fact that miRNAs have very precise expression patterns depending on the cell type, tissue and/or developmental stage; it is challenging to generalize a single mechanism to regulate their expression and to identify the target genes that each miRNA has during each stage of neurogenesis. Thus, the combination of bioinformatic tools and experimental techniques will help in the study of miRNAs role in early neurogenesis and how they, their…

Read More

Drunks and Monkeys: Pseudoscientific nonsense

Drunks and Monkeys Understanding our primate ancestors’ relationship with alcohol can inform its use by modern humans. By Robert Dudley | June 1, 2014 Excerpt: “…if the right kinds of bacteria are also present, fermentation will stabilize certain foodstuffs (think cheese, yogurt, sauerkraut, and kimchi, for example).” My comment:  Epigenetic changes induced by ethanol in astrocytes link histone acetylation, DNA methylation, and non-coding microRNAs in the developing and adult brain from frugivory to the nutrient-dependent de novo creation of olfactory receptor genes in bats. The…

Read More

Evolution: innovations may have non-adaptive origins (sans mutations)

Q & A: Evolution Makes Do By Chris Palmer Evolutionary biologist Andreas Wagner argues that many evolutionary innovations may have non-adaptive origins. Excerpt: “If exaptations are pervasive, then natural selection—which few doubt is critical for the preservation and spreading of traits—may not be that important for the origin of innovations in life’s history.” See also: Rapid detection of positive selection in genes and genomes through variation clusters Excerpt: “They occur in well-defined domains of a protein’s tertiary structure and show…

Read More
  • Hello world!
    Welcome to WordPress. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start writing! The post Hello world! appeared first on Pheromones by LuvEssentials.