Epigenetic

Dual genomes: exposing the evolution industry

Multiple haplotype-resolved genomes reveal population patterns of gene and protein diplotypes Excerpt: “The CDP showed a significant overrepresentation of certain gene ontology (GO) groups (global tests Po0.001–0.009), using the programme FUNC23 (Methods). These groups included GPCRs, in particular olfactory receptors (ORs), and other membrane and cell-surface proteins, as well as proteins related to the immune system, such as the MHC (Class I and II), and drug metabolism…” My comment: Biodiversity “…converges upon a ‘common diplotypic proteome (CDP)’, a distinctive subset…

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Meaningful dialogue, anonymous fools and idiot minions

I use definitions to describe differences in behavior. I do not define biologically-based facts in attempts to make the definitions fit into the context of ridiculous theories about the development of behavior. I am not an idiot. An idiot is “…someone who acts in a self-defeating or significantly counterproductive way…. An idiot differs from a fool (who is unwise)…. the terms “idiot” and “idiocy” describe an extreme folly or stupidity, and its symptoms (foolish or stupid utterance or deed).” Serious scientists may…

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RNA-mediated events and "The Theory of Everything"

The Large Scale Structure of Space-Time Co-author George F.R. Ellis won the 2004 Templeton Prize People like him are likely to recognize the top-down link from light-induced de novo creation of nucleic acids and nutrient-dependendent RNA-mediated amino acid substitutions to epigenetically-effected neuronal structure and function. In my model, light-induced amino acid substitutions are linked to the nutrient-dependent amino acid substitutions that differentiate all cell types of all individuals of all organisms. Neuronal cell type differentiation is linked to behavior. See…

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Sackler Colloquium: Effects or AFFECTS on Behavior

Arthur M. Sackler Colloquium of the National Academy of Sciences, “Epigenetic Changes in the Developing Brain: Effects on Behavior,” held March 28–29, 2014, at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC. The complete program and video recordings of most presentations are available on the NAS website. I reiterate: the title is: Epigenetic changes in the developing brain: Effects on behavior I was taught that the epigenetic landscape must be linked to physical landscape of DNA in organized genomes of…

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The key to science: experimental evidence

  If it disagrees with the experiment, it’s wrong! — Richard Feynman (1964) Two different experiments are among others from the Vosshall lab that show the theory of evolution is wrong. 1) This experiment links induced mutations in olfactory receptor genes to the inability to find a source of nutrients. orco mutant mosquitoes lose strong preference for humans and are not repelled by volatile DEET The source is a human, and the presence of humans is a recent addition to…

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There’s a model for that!

Neuroscientists reveal mechanism crucial to molding male brains Excerpt 1) “…sex differences in brain function are established during the later stages of foetal development and around birth, but the actual cellular mechanisms underlying these important actions remained unknown.” My comment: In our 1996 Hormones and Behavior review we provided details about how these cellular mechanisms link sex differences in brain function, which are established during the later stages of fetal development, to the sex differences that are established perinatally. We…

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Biologists puzzled by evolved RNAs and decaying DNA

Horizontal Transfer of Entire Genomes via Mitochondrial Fusion in the Angiosperm Amborella (December, 2013) Excerpt) “The ancestral angiosperm-wide genome duplication apparent in the Amborella genome not only serves as a genetic marker for the origin of extant angiosperms, but it may also have set in motion a series of events as numerous genes evolved novel functions, eventually leading to modern flowering plants.” See also: The Amborella Genome and the Evolution of Flowering Plants Excerpt) “Evolution of Small RNAs More than…

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More than a bag of chemicals?

From Fertilization to Adult Sexual Behavior (1996) Excerpt: “Small intranuclear proteins also participate in generating alternative splicing techniques of pre-mRNA and, by this mechanism, contribute to sexual differentiation in at least two species, Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans…” My comment: How far can this model of RNA-mediated cell type differentiation go? What links the model to ADHD? Could it be a single amino acid substitution (see below)? If so, can the response to ADHD pharmacotherapy be predicted by what is…

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Nothing new under the sun, except pseudoscientific nonsense

On the Importance of Being a Methodological Naturalist Posted on November 5, 2014 by David Sloan Wilson Excerpt: “…consider the flying spaghetti monster, a deity invented to poke fun at religion. It is ridiculous, but is there any way to prove that it doesn’t exist?” Conclusion: “If religious believers abandon methodological naturalism, then they are forced to deny not only the laws of physics and the facts biological evolution, but the histories of their own religions.” My comments: DS Wilson is…

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Intelligent viruses and cancers?

The Very Intelligent Ebola Virus Takes Front and Center Excerpt 1) “Ebola doesn’t enter the nucleus. It uses the cell’s machinery of ribosomes and transfer RNA to make proteins from the viral messengerRNA.” Excerpt 2) “Normally, mechanisms inside the nucleus have complex relations with messenger RNA and the alternative RNA editing process (see RNA alternative editing post). Specific protein complexes help splice the messengerRNA before it is sent from the nucleus to the ribosomes in the cytoplasm to make proteins.”…

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