fish

Food supplement or licensed immunostimulant?

Glucan from Food Supplement to a Licensed Drug   Excerpt: “…β-glucan possesses a significant immunostimulating activity in a wide variety of species, including earthworms, shrimp, fish, chicken, rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, sheep, pigs, cattle, and, last but not least, humans. Based on these results, it has been concluded that β-glucan represents a type of immunostimulanting molecule that is actively spanning full evolutionary spectrum. Some experiments also show that β-glucan can help even in the protection of plants. β-Glucan is therefore…

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Energy dependent RNA-mediated immunity (4)

The Mitochondrial Basis of Aging Excerpt:  …the mutation at amino acid position 257 results in an enzyme that retains normal polymerase function but has impaired proofreading activity. Mice containing one or two copies of this proofreading-deficient POLG accumulate a significant level of mitochondrial mutations, and homozygous knockin mice exhibit an accelerated aging phenotype (Kujoth et al., 2005; Trifunovic et al., 2004). Nonetheless, while this model clearly links mitochondrial mutations to aging, it should be noted that the type and magnitude…

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Baby talk: More misrepresentations of ecological adaptations

Evolution’s Baby Steps by Carl Zimmer Excerpt 1) “When organisms find themselves in a new environment, they develop in a way that helps them cope with their new surroundings. Their descendants may acquire mutations that encode that anatomy in their genes. Eventually evolution takes them beyond where plasticity alone could take them.” My comment: It’s time for science journalists to stop touting this nonsense (above). Ecological variation leads from nutrient uptake in new environments to RNA-mediated amino acid substitutions. If…

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Are pheromones responsible for human body odour assessment?

Can You Smell Yourself? by Sarah C. P. Williams on 22 January 2013, 5:10 PM Excerpt: “Other molecules the human body produces could also influence individual smells and scent preferences, Zufall says. The individuality of people’s microbiomes—the collection of microbes living in and on us—could also be linked to the body’s odor or preferences, Wedekind says. “We just don’t know the full physiology yet,” he said, “But this is a good start.” My comment: The full physiology has been detailed.…

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