mice

From quantum physics to quantum souls (4)

The long-range consequences of food energy-dependent social factors predictably link everything known about social odors called pheromones from the quantized energy in food to metabolism and biophysically constrained viral latency.  Sympatric speciation exemplifies what is known about how quantized energy links the pheromone-controlled physiology of reproduction to biophysically constrained viral latency in species from microbes to humans. In this review of biophysically constrained viral latency and biodiversity, I linked energy-dependent changes from angstroms to ecosystems in the mouse-to-human model of microRNA-mediated amino…

Read More

Host-derived creation of all pathology (2 of 2)

Summary: All serious scientists know that all epigenetic diversity is food energy-dependent and biophysically constrained by the pheromone-controlled physiology of reproduction. See for comparison: Jay R. Feierman: “Variation is not nutrient availability and the something that is doing the selecting is not the individual organism. A feature of an educated person is to realize what they do not know. Sadly, you don’t know that you have an incorrect understanding [of] Darwinian biological evolution.” A Bacterial Messenger Molecule Extends Healthspan …indole,…

Read More

Wikipedia refutes theistic evolution

RNA-Directed DNA Methylation Besides RNA molecules, a plethora of proteins are involved in the establishment of RdDM, like Argonautes, DNA methyltransferases, chromatin remodelling complexes and the plant-specific Polymerase IV and Polymerase V. All these act in concert to add a methyl-group at the 5′ position of cytosines. In contrast to animals, cytosines at all sequence context (CG, CHG, CHH) may get de novo methylated in plants. There is no such thing as de novo methylation. Methylation is energy-dependent. Virus-driven energy…

Read More

Epigenetics and autophagy vs mutations and evolution (2)

Plants send light to roots to ‘see’ underground My comment: Sending light requires an energy-dependent link from hydrogen-atom transfer in DNA base pairs in solution to supercoiled DNA, which protects all organanized genomes from virus-driven energy theft and genomic entropy. See Schrodinger (1944) Excerpt: Indeed, in the case of higher animals we know the kind of orderliness they feed upon well enough, viz. the extremely well-ordered state of matter in more or less complicated organic compounds, which serve them as…

Read More

How did the innate immune system evolve?

Sexually Antagonistic Male Signals Manipulate Germline and Soma of C. elegans Hermaphrodites Abstract excerpt: Why would a system exist that reduces the vigor of potential mates prior to mating? Addressing this question could provide insights into mechanisms and evolution of sexual conflict and reveal sensory inputs that regulate aging. Highlights excerpt: An unknown signal accelerates larval development, specifically the onset of puberty Reported as: Male chemistry primes females for reproduction—but at a cost “There is a fine balance between reproduction and…

Read More

Plant microRNAs slow virus-driven aging

Six plant extracts delay yeast chronological aging through different signaling pathways The evolutionarily conserved nutrient-sensing signaling pathways that accelerate chronological aging in yeast (Figure 9) are known to stimulate chronological senescence and geroconversion of post-mitotic human cells; these pathways are likely to expedite organismal aging and cancer development in humans [87-93]. There is no experimental evidence of biologically-based cause and effect that starts with the conservation of nutrient-sensing pathways. The nutrient-sensing pathways link the de novo creation of G protein-coupled…

Read More

Energy dependent RNA-mediated immunity (4)

The Mitochondrial Basis of Aging Excerpt:  …the mutation at amino acid position 257 results in an enzyme that retains normal polymerase function but has impaired proofreading activity. Mice containing one or two copies of this proofreading-deficient POLG accumulate a significant level of mitochondrial mutations, and homozygous knockin mice exhibit an accelerated aging phenotype (Kujoth et al., 2005; Trifunovic et al., 2004). Nonetheless, while this model clearly links mitochondrial mutations to aging, it should be noted that the type and magnitude…

Read More

Correctly modeling life on this planet

We cannot conceive of a global external factor that could cause, during this time, parallel evolution of amino acid compositions of proteins in 15 diverse taxa that represent all three domains of life and span a wide range of lifestyles and environments. Thus, currently, the most plausible hypothesis is that we are observing a universal, intrinsic trend that emerged before the last universal common ancestor of all extant organisms. — Jordan et al., (2005) The increase in the number of…

Read More

RNA-mediated cell type differentiation and behavior

Neuroscience Meeting Planner Now Available The Preliminary Program and Neuroscience Meeting Planner for Neuroscience 2014 are available. At the 2012 Meeting I learned that the microRNA/messenger RNA balance had emerged during the past decade to be the most likely regulator of all downstream effects on cell type differentiation. That inspired me to focus on what I knew about RNA-mediated events and put what we detailed about them in our 1996 Hormones and Behavior review into the context of a this…

Read More

Metabolism, fixation, health or neurodegerative disorder

“Shown is the location of the conserved regions encoding for the N-terminal chromo domain and the C-terminal MYST functional domain. An arrow denotes the position site of amino acid substitution E431Q.” Microarray Analysis Uncovers a Role for Tip60 in Nervous System Function and General Metabolism My comment: The article links a nutrient-dependent amino acid substitution via changes in metabolism to cell type differentiation, multicellularity, and brain development in Drosophila. It suggests the substitution is fixed by the model organism’s pheromone-controlled…

Read More