microbes to man

Color vision refutes the evolutionary dogma of gene duplication

The Rainbow Connection Color vision as we know it resulted from one fortuitous genetic event after another. By Kerry Grens | October 1, 2014 Excerpt 1: “The fact that we have the same few amino-acid substitutions as New World monkeys argues there was a single ancestral variation that gave rise to [the cone opsins of] both Old and New World primates,” Nathans says. “It leads to an interesting twist on the evolutionary dogma of gene duplication.” My comment: The fact…

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Forces of "Nature" limit dissemination of information

Force of nature gave life its asymmetry Excerpt: “In 2011, Meierhenrich and colleages showed4 that such light could transfer its handedness to amino acids. But even demonstrating how a common physical phenomenon would have favoured left-handed amino acids over right-handed ones would not tell us that this was how life evolved, adds Laurence Barron, a chemist at the University of Glasgow, UK. “There are no clinchers. We may never know.” My comment:I think the clincher is the creation of the…

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Physics, Chemistry, and Molecular biology (PCMb)

Physics, Chemistry, and Molecular biology (PCMb) link ecological variation to ecological adaptations via a model of gene-cell-tissue-organ-organ system complexity that I first presented in 1992. After adding gene activation by pheromones, I co-authored a book that linked the pheromone-controlled physiology of reproduction across species from microbes to man: The Scent of Eros: Mysteries of Odor in Human Sexuality (1995/2002) Since then, others have written books that claimed that pheromones evolved: Pheromones and Animal Behaviour (2003/2014) and one claimed that mammals…

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Stop evolutionary theorists. Kill cancers

Bacterial ‘communication system’ could be used to stop, kill cancer cells, study finds Excerpt: “During an infection, bacteria release molecules which allow them to ‘talk’ to each other,” said the lead author of the study. “Depending on the type of molecule released, the signal will tell other bacteria to multiply, escape the immune system or even stop spreading.” My comment: Nutrient-dependent cell type proliferation is pheromone-controlled during health and infections — and in other diseases and disorders. The conserved molecular…

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Did our adapted mind evolve? (Revisited)

Did our adapted mind evolve? In my extended comments on this topic I concluded with “Experience-dependent changes in DNA methylation can exert profound effects on neuronal function and behaviour. A single learning event can induce a variety of DNA modifications within the neuronal genome, some of which may be common to all individuals experiencing the event, whereas others may occur in a subset of individuals.” The experience-dependent changes are due to RNA-directed DNA methylation (i.e., RNA-mediated events, not evolutionary events).…

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RNA-directed DNA methylation and RNA-mediated events

Many colleagues and most of my antagonists seem to be unwilling to accept the fact that RNA-directed DNA methylation links the epigenetic landscape to the physical landscape of DNA in the organized genomes of species from microbes to man. Lack of acceptance appears to be due to the fact that they think mutations and natural selection link evolutionary events to biodiversity. There is no model for that, but they refuse to accept the fact that RNA-mediated events link ecological variation…

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Miracles are not miracles to evolutionary theorists

Science 19 September 2014: Vol. 345 no. 6203 pp. 1443-1445 DOI: 10.1126/science.345.6203.1443 No miracles Excerpt: “There’s a reason these crows make tools and other birds don’t,” he says. “It’s not a miracle.” THAT SENTENCE, along with the even shorter phrase “no miracles,” is a favorite of Gray’s. The power of evolution “to explain many things,” as he puts it, struck him when he was still in high school in Tauranga, south of Auckland, after reading Richard Dawkins’s The Selfish Gene.”…

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Seemingly futile cycles are not thermodynamically futile

Scientists discover an on/off switch for aging cells The switch controls the growth of telomeres, the timekeepers of cells September 19, 2014 Excerpt: Understanding how this “off” switch can be manipulated–thereby slowing down the telomere shortening process–could lead to treatments for diseases of aging (for example, regenerating vital organs later in life).” My comment: Seemingly futile thermodynamic cycles of protein biosynthesis and  degradation appear to be confusing. I’m somewhat certain that the folks at Salk realize that cycles of biophysically-constrained…

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Probable changes in connectivity

Table of Contents: Nature Reviews Neuroscience October 2014 Vol 15 No 10 Excerpt from: Research Highlights: Learning and memory: Uncoupling memory traces “The emotional valence of a memory can be changed, and this probably involves a change in the connectivity between hippocampal and amygdalar memory traces.” My comment: 1) The connectivity change is epigenetically-effected by olfactory/pheromonal input. 2) Epigenetically-effected RNA-mediated events link the epigenetic landscape to the physical landscape of DNA in species from microbes to man. 3) Conserved molecular…

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A molecular visualizer of worthwhile molecular biology

Ruben Gonzalez Jr.: Molecular Visualizer Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Chemistry, Columbia University. Age 42 By Jef Akst | September 1, 2014 Excerpt: “Much of his group’s current work involves extending discoveries about translation in E. coli to the process in eukaryotes, with an eye toward human health and disease.” My comment: That sums up the frustration that other serious scientists must share when they hear pseudoscientific nonsense touted about mutations, natural selection, and the evolution…

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