pathogenesis

Protonated RNA interference vs stupid theories (5)

See first: Protonated RNA interference vs stupid theories (4) See with my emphasis The noncoding and coding transcriptional landscape of the peripheral immune response in patients with COVID‐19 10/11/20 Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) are a class of RNAs not involved in protein production and can be subdivided into small (miRNAs, tRNAs, PIWI‐targeting RNAs) and long ncRNAs (lncRNAs), based upon their size.8 This class of RNAs not only regulates fundamental biological processes including immune system development and regulation, but also plays a…

Read More

Science vs Secularism: Molecular Mechanisms or Math?

Summary: An example from ancient knowledge of trigonometry links pattern recognition as the basis for the science of creationism, and pattern recognition also is the basis for molecular biology. What form of virus-driven pathology would you most like to see eliminated from future consideration by serious scientists who know how energy-dependent RNA-mediated cell type differentiation occurs? In any case, a PubMed search for microRNA and your disease of choice will be enlightening. See for example: microRNA + Alzheimer’s or microRNA…

Read More

Serious scientists refute theistic evolution again

See: Pseudoscientists fail to refute theistic evolution Seagrass ecosystems reduce exposure to bacterial pathogens of humans, fishes, and invertebrates Reported as: Underwater grasslands can cut concentrations of harmful bacteria in half …deadly coral diseases were 50% less prevalent in regions with seagrass meadows. The scientists aren’t entirely sure how the seagrass combats bacteria so effectively, but one possibility could be that it anchors the nutrient-rich sediment to the sea floor, effectively preventing harmful microbes from feeding on the nutrients. They…

Read More

The human virome (revisited)

From October 2013: Describing the Silent Human Virome with an Emphasis on Giant Viruses “…viruses infect all domains of life, including bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes, and are found in all ecological niches [2]. This pleiotropic distribution on our planet allows viruses to play the role of ‘natural motors’ that drive global energy and nutrient cycling [3,4].” My comment: The portrayal of viruses as ‘natural motors’ is made outside the context of the fact that the energy-dependent changes attributed to the…

Read More

The Aquatic Ape: New evidence?

The Waterside Ape BBC Radio 4 Publicity Sir David Attenborough considers whether new evidence will help a once widely ridiculed theory of human origins move towards to mainstream acceptance. In 1960, the eminent Oxford marine biologist Sir Alister Hardy proposed a revolutionary idea: that our human ancestors had not started their existence on the wide savannahs of Africa, but had become accustomed to living alongside water – swimming and diving in the shallows, collecting the abundant food, and learning to…

Read More

Antithetical conclusions (7)

Streamlining the E.coli Genetic Code Once the E. coli genome is pared down to 57 codons, the seven blank codons can be reintegrated and used to introduce nonstandard amino acids, the researchers have proposed; this would open the door to creating a wider range of proteins for industrial applications. A recoded genome also imparts resistance to viral infection and can be used for biocontainment: the DNA incorporated from wild-type E. coli or viruses can’t be used to build proteins successfully…

Read More

RNAi: From magic bullet to billion dollar baby

UW-Madison technology enlisted in battle against hepatitis B DNA operates through RNA, and when RNA interference was discovered in 1998, it seemed like a magic bullet that could fight disease by specifically shutting down problematic genes. Before RNA interference was discovered pre-mRNAs were already linked to cell type differentiation in species from microbes to mammals. From Fertilization to Adult Sexual Behavior (1996) Small intranuclear proteins also participate in generating alternative splicing techniques of pre-mRNA and, by this mechanism, contribute to…

Read More

From angstroms to ecosystems

How a happy moment for neuroscience is a sad moment for science Systems neuroscience is celebrating a landmark, but one that shows the way we do science is broken. Excerpt: These data are the first complete set of neural activity recordings released before publication. No papers preceded it; not even a report. Nothing. Just: here you go guys, the fruits of the joint labour of around 100 people over 4 years.” My comment: They released the information on June 13,…

Read More