stickleback

Cytosis: Biology content (2)

Cytosis is a [energy-dependent] transport mechanism for the movement of large quantities of molecules into and out of cells. There are three main types of cytosis: endocytosis (into the cell), exocytosis (out of the cell), and transcytosis (through the cell, in and out). See also: Cytosis: A Cell Biology Board Game 3/27/17 See also: Cytosis: Biology Content 4/4/17 Cytosis: A Cell Biology Board Game  4/12/17 A board game taking place inside a human cell! Players compete to build enzymes, hormones…

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How fast can evolutionary theory be changed?

Boston, land of…creationists? Excerpt: “For example, right now a creationist with a Harvard science degree is lecturing in Boston on Evolution: Bankrupt Science; Creationism: Science You Can Bank On. Obviously, Dr Nathaniel Jeanson is one of the fruit loops who plodded through a graduate program.” My comment: Dr Nathaniel Jeanson continues to politely lead the way to understanding the science of creation. See: Purpose, Progress, and Promise, Part 5 Excerpt: “The intense focus the secular community has placed on human…

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RNA-mediated ecological adaptations of teeth

Counting fish teeth reveals DNA changes behind rapid evolution By Robert Sanders, Media Relations | September 17, 2014 Excerpt: “This is one of the first cases where we find that the rules found for traits lost apply as well to traits gained,” said Miller. My comment: Traits are gained and lost in the context of nutrient-dependent, odor-induced, receptor-mediated, RNA-mediated events that lead to amino acid substitutions that differentiate cell types. The cell type differentiation must be manifested in morphological and…

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Baby talk: More misrepresentations of ecological adaptations

Evolution’s Baby Steps by Carl Zimmer Excerpt 1) “When organisms find themselves in a new environment, they develop in a way that helps them cope with their new surroundings. Their descendants may acquire mutations that encode that anatomy in their genes. Eventually evolution takes them beyond where plasticity alone could take them.” My comment: It’s time for science journalists to stop touting this nonsense (above). Ecological variation leads from nutrient uptake in new environments to RNA-mediated amino acid substitutions. If…

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The wrong picture of our evolution

“We have built a picture of our evolution based on the morphology of fossils and it was wrong.” I’ve repeatedly cited the latest literature, especially in the context of Skull 5. The article linked below is another clear representation of how the wrong picture of our evolution was built via a series of misrepresentations that ignored biological constraints while theorists touted mutation-initiated natural selection. Why don’t they simply admit that they are wrong, so others can move on? Fifty years…

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Your comment is awaiting moderation

After I posted 5 of the 14 comments to the National Geographic site during discussion of Mercenary Ants Protect Farmers With Chemical Weapons by Ed Yong, I got the message: “Your comment is awaiting “moderation” Typically, that means I will not be allowed to continue participation in the discussion I started, which is why I am blog-posting my comment here. Perhaps I have been too harsh in my responses to people who keep politely telling me I am WRONG. Perhaps,…

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Nutrient-dependent pheromone-controlled stickleback evolution

Sexual imprinting on ecologically divergent traits leads to sexual isolation in sticklebacks Excerpt: “Odour differences may be owing to pleiotropic effects of adaptive differences in diet [18], habitat [12] and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alleles selected by parasite differences [19,20].” Excerpt: “…imprinting has turned odour and nuptial coloration into magic traits.” My comment: In my model, natural odour production in vertebrates is not a magic trait. It results from the role of food odours in nutrient-dependent RNA-mediated ecological niche construction.…

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Are pheromones responsible for human body odour assessment?

Can You Smell Yourself? by Sarah C. P. Williams on 22 January 2013, 5:10 PM Excerpt: “Other molecules the human body produces could also influence individual smells and scent preferences, Zufall says. The individuality of people’s microbiomes—the collection of microbes living in and on us—could also be linked to the body’s odor or preferences, Wedekind says. “We just don’t know the full physiology yet,” he said, “But this is a good start.” My comment: The full physiology has been detailed.…

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A thought experiment

I may be confused about proximate and ultimate cause, especially if the role of transgenerational epigenetic inheritance is not central to the extended evolutionary synthesis. Isn’t transgenerational epigenetic inheritance the problem that led Dickins and Rahman to suggest a thought experiment; one where epigenetic mechanisms introduce shifts in learning bias for certain associations as would endocrine functioning? If so, my model (Kohl, 2012), which combines the epigenetic effects of nutrient chemicals and pheromones with biased endocrine functioning and adaptive evolution,…

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