Svante Paabo

The MicroRNAome Strikes Back: A Sokalian hoax (10)

Linda Buck, Ben Feringa, Michael Gazzaniga, Christof Koch, Nick Lane and Svante Paabo are among the presenters who will almost undoubtedly discuss some or all of my claims. Prepare to ask questions or intelligently discuss accurate representations of top-down causation by watching this: The energy-dependent creation of the microRNAome protects the organized genomes of all living genera from the virus-driven degradation of messenger RNA that links mutations to all pathology. See: The Bull Sperm MicroRNAome and the Effect of Fescue…

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Dobzhansky 1973 and Precision Medicine (2)

See also: Dobzhansky 1973 and precision medicine What Did Neanderthals Leave to Modern Humans? Some Surprises A few years ago, the Swedish geneticist Svante Paabo received an unusual fossilized bone fragment from Siberia. He extracted the DNA, sequenced it and realized it was neither human nor Neanderthal. Savante Paabo co-authored this refutation of neo-Darwinian nonsense in 2003.Natural Selection on the Olfactory Receptor Gene Family in Humans and Chimpanzees It links natural selection for energy-dependent codon optimality from the pheromone-controlled physiology…

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Energy-dependent de novo creation and neurogenesis (2)

See also: Energy-dependent de novo creation and neurogenesis 12/7/16 Atlas of the RNA universe takes shape Excerpt: MicroRNA are very mysterious. They are really relics of the RNA world—pieces of RNA that are highly reactive, very small and which pair and bind other RNA and facilitate catalytic reactions,” Mangone says. “We don’t know much about them—where they come from or how they regulate gene expression, but they are very misregulated in many diseases. See also: Nutrient-dependent/pheromone-controlled adaptive evolution: a model…

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Hydrogen-atom energy in DNA base pairs

See also: Consciousness is simply food rearranged Role of Double Hydrogen Atom Transfer Reactions in Atmospheric Chemistry Abstract excerpt:  Hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions are ubiquitous and play a crucial role in chemistries occurring in the atmosphere, biology, and industry. My comment: The link from physics to chemistry and the conserved molecular mechanisms of biologically-based RNA-mediated cell type differentiation has been the focus my works for more than 20 years, even before I knew what I would need to explain…

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Fossils vs cell types and the brain

Fossils, cells point to early appearance of the brain Excerpt: “…the kinds of inferences from comparative developmental studies such as [Arendt’s] are, right now, the only speculative route back into time,” Strausfeld says. See also: All in the (bigger) family Excerpt: …new insights about what it took for an ancient crustacean to give rise to insects. The new insights mentioned in an earlier article by Elizabeth Pennisi have since linked nutrient-dependent microRNAs and adhesion proteins to supercoiled DNA in the…

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UV-light mutations and gene loss (not gain)

The Neanderthals live on in us March 13, 2015 Excerpt: “He opted instead for a medical degree and then a PhD at the University of Uppsala, where he was supposed to be probing the DNA secrets of a virus.” My comment: If he had done what he was supposed to be doing, he might have learned how viral microRNAs and nutrient-dependent microRNAs contribute to cell type differentiation in all cells of all individuals of all species. If he had done…

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RNA-mediated repurposing in microbes and adaptations in primate brains

Human-specific gene ARHGAP11B promotes basal progenitor amplification and neocortex expansion Excerpt: “…the C-terminal 47 amino-acids of ARHGAP11B (after lysine-220) constitute not only a unique sequence, resulting from a frameshifting deletion (fig. S10), but also are functionally distinct from their counterpart in ARHGAP11A.” My comment: Co-author Svante Paabo is the senior author of this 2003 publication: Natural Selection on the Olfactory Receptor Gene Family in Humans and Chimpanzees The 2015 publication was reported as: A gene for brain size only found…

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