I have never been forced to revisit a blog post on the day after it was posted, until now. The Scientist has misrepresented everything known to all serious scientists about the eternal significance of microRNAs in:

Sweet Tooth Gene Tied to Less Body Fat

“These results suggest that FGF21 has pleiotropic effects, with separate effects on macronutrient intake to those on body shape and blood pressure,” the authors write in their report.

My comment to The Scientist

See All About that Base (Meghan Trainor Parody) 12/10/14 from the Zechiedrich lab and their 2015 published work: Structural diversity of supercoiled DNA

A Common Allele in FGF21 Associated with Sugar Intake Is Associated with Body Shape, Lower Total Body-Fat Percentage, and Higher Blood Pressure is an open access publication.

The authors link one food energy-dependent change in a base pair from rs838133, which is an A/G/T single-nucleotide variation on human chromosome 19, to biophysically constrained viral latency and healthy longevity in the mouse-primate-human model of pheromone-controlled reproduction.

In that model, and in all model organisms feedback loops link what organisms eat to all morphological and behavioral diversity. See: Nutrient-dependent pheromone-controlled ecological adaptations: from atoms to ecosystems

The atoms to ecosystems model of sympatric speciation refutes neo-Darwinian pseudoscentific nonsense by linking rs3827760, also known as 1540T/C, 370A, V370A, or Val370Ala, from a SNP in the ectodysplasin A receptor EDAR gene on chromosome 2 to conserved morphological and behavioral phenotypes in mice and humans.

My past comments to The Scientist may be removed before others can see how my 500+ comments have continued to attest to the facts about sympatric speciation since the time that Eugene Garfield posted his comment about “The Scent of Eros: Mysteries of Odor in Human Sexuality. See “Scent of a Book Deal” (1995)

We made a deal with the editor at Continuum Publishing  to include an attestation to mutations and evolution. I mentioned that to the late Eugene Garfield at the time I met with him in Minot, ND during a conference he funded in its entirety. His friend William Turner and I were among the few people who knew that Gene was present. He kept a low profile so that he could listen and learn.

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