Researchers who believe in the mutation-driven evolution of species and mutation-driven differences in human populations have invented another ridiculous hypothesis. Now, they believe in mathematical models that infer: Cultural hitchhiking and competition between patrilineal kin groups explain the post-Neolithic Y-chromosome bottleneck

In human populations, changes in genetic variation are driven not only by genetic processes, but can also arise from cultural or social changes. An abrupt population bottleneck specific to human males has been inferred across several Old World (Africa, Europe, Asia) populations 5000–7000 BP. Here, bringing together anthropological theory, recent population genomic studies and mathematical models, we propose a sociocultural hypothesis, involving the formation of patrilineal kin groups and intergroup competition among these groups. Our analysis shows that this sociocultural hypothesis can explain the inference of a population bottleneck. We also show that our hypothesis is consistent with current findings from the archaeogenetics of Old World Eurasia, and is important for conceptions of cultural and social evolution in prehistory.

The inferred cultural or social changes were reported as: Wars and clan structure may explain a strange biological event 7,000 years ago

To test their ideas, the researchers turned to mathematical models and computer simulations in which men fought—and died—for the resources their clans needed to survive.

Serious scientists and members of the American Legion (motto: For God and Country) know that men fight and die to defend their loved ones from aggressors. Serious scientists also know that all the clans needed to the find the quantized energy that is biophysically constrained in food, or the virus-driven degradation of messenger RNA would limit their survival.

The serious scientists and most members of the American Legion have little use for mathematical models or for inferences.

See for instance. These claims are made outside the context of men fighting and dying: Environmental selection during the last ice age on the mother-to-infant transmission of vitamin D and fatty acids through breast milk

The frequency of the human-specific EDAR V370A allele appears to be uniquely elevated in North and East Asian and New World populations due to a bout of positive selection likely to have occurred circa 20,000 y ago.

The report of the inferred “strange biological event 7,000 years ago” is ridiculously inconsistent with inferences about several Old World (Africa, Europe, Asia) populations 5000–7000 y ago. The frequency of the fixation of one food energy-dependent RNA-mediated amino acid substitution links human populations in North and East Asian to New World populations. This across-continent examples of concurrent changes in the New World and Old World place ecologically adapted human populations into what all serious scientists expect would happen in the context of all reports from other serious scientists.

See for example:

The Bull Sperm MicroRNAome and the Effect of Fescue Toxicosis on Sperm MicroRNA Expression

Transgenerational epigenetic programming via sperm microRNA recapitulates effects of paternal stress

Codon optimality controls differential mRNA translation during amino acid starvation

Codon identity regulates mRNA stability and translation efficiency during the maternal-to-zygotic transition

See for comparison: Spanish Flu

The Spanish flu pandemic of 1918, the deadliest in history, infected an estimated 500 million people worldwide—about one-third of the planet’s population—and killed an estimated 20 million to 50 million victims, including some 675,000 Americans. The 1918 flu was first observed in Europe, the United States and parts of Asia before swiftly spreading around the world.

If the interactions among human populations led to virus-driven pathology via the degradation of messenger RNA in organized genomes, the 1918 Spanish flu could readily be linked to Past 5,000 years prolific for changes to human genome via Environmental selection during the last ice age on the mother-to-infant transmission of vitamin D and fatty acids through breast milk

I reiterate:

The frequency of the human-specific EDAR V370A allele appears to be uniquely elevated in North and East Asian and New World populations due to a bout of positive selection likely to have occurred circa 20,000 y ago.

Natural selection for quantized energy-dependent protein folding chemistry links what organisms eat to biophysically constrained viral latency and differences in human populations via the pheromone-controlled physiology of reproduction. Scientific creationists in South Korea have used that fact to force the denuclearization of North Korea.

See my series of 10 blog posts on The Eternal Significance of MicroRNAs and 2 more about The Crack in the Granite Wall (The Vietnam Memorial Wall)

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