Cockroaches Accumulate Light to See in the Dark

Excerpt: “Taking into account the size of the experiment’s stripes, the optical properties of the roaches’ eyes and the amount of photons available, the team concluded that the roach nervous system pools information from its thousands of photoreceptors over time—in effect, accumulating electrical neural signals and using the summation of those signals to see.”

My comment: If there were no link from light-induced amino acid substitutions to nutrient-dependent cell type differentiation in roaches via the control of reproduction by pheromones, it would not matter if they could pool the information “…from thousands of photoreceptors over time. Unless that information can be linked from food odors to successful nutrient-dependent pheromone-controlled reproduction, species become extinct.

Attributing the success of cockroaches or any other species to their ability to process light energy, makes it appear that some species are less dependent on olfactory acuity and specificity than others. That’s how evolutionary theorists have made some people think that the human sense of smell is less important to survival of our species than it is to the survival of others species. Their misrepresentations ignore what is currently known about physics, chemistry, and the conserved molecular mechanisms that link the physiology and behavior of insects to primates.

See also: How Random Is Social Behaviour? Disentangling Social Complexity through the Study of a Wild House Mouse Population

Excerpt:  Among the most elementary tools used to explain group behaviour are random processes, a typical example being the so-called “random walk”.

My comment: There is no such thing as a “random walk.” The anti-entropic biological energy of the sun links movement in species from microbes to man via conserved molecular mechanisms and the biophysically constrained nutrient-dependent RNA-mediated chemistry of protein folding.

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