No, they don’t.

See: Why Is This Bacterium Hiding in Human Tumors? Whether Fusobacterium nucleatum causes colon tumors is unknown. But a new study hints that it may be “an integral part of the cancer.”

Serious scientists have linked bacteriophages to all virus-driven pathology. Cancer is a virus-driven pathology. That’s the truth!

In  the New York Times article by Gina Kolata she wrote:

“The whole idea of bacteria in tumors is fascinating and unexpected,” said Dr. Bert Vogelstein, a colon cancer researcher at Johns Hopkins.

Vogelstein’s theory that cancer is due to “bad luck’ attests to the fact that he is a biologically uninformed science idiot. As as journalist you can’t pursue the truth by interviewing liars and / or idiots.

‘Bad luck’ of random mutations plays predominant role in cancer, study shows

“All cancers are caused by a combination of bad luck, the environment and heredity, and we’ve created a model that may help quantify how much of these three factors contribute to cancer development,” says Bert Vogelstein, M.D., the Clayton Professor of Oncology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, co-director of the Ludwig Center at Johns Hopkins and an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

See for comparison: A Concise Review of MicroRNA Exploring the Insights of MicroRNA Regulations in Bacterial, Viral and Metabolic Diseases

Overexpressed miRNAs may function as both oncogenes and regulator of cellular processes. The miRNA functions can be altered by single-point mutations in miRNA target and epigenetic silencing of transcription units. There are numerous molecular targets for miRNA as degradation by nuclease and phosphodiesterase. Thus, miRNA has potential applications in disease diagnosis along with therapy, but the mechanisms involved in miRNA systems and its targeted delivery of miRNA are much more important to achieve its therapeutic applications.

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